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Tags: Research Spotlight

Thu, 05/28/2020 - 8:05am
My time working at the MOSAiC ice floe has come to an end, and I am currently traveling south on Polarstern towards Svalbard, where the exchange between personnel from Legs 3 and 4 of the project will take place. Due to the travel restrictions in place because of COVID-19, this exchange has been delayed from early April. It was not possible to carry out the exchange at the ice floe itself, as originally planned. So Polarstern has left the floe…
Wed, 05/20/2020 - 8:50am
Savannah, Ga. – University of Georgia Skidaway Institute of Oceanography scientist Catherine Edwards is participating in a collaborative project that will track the migration patterns of important fish species using artificial intelligence and a fleet of underwater robots. The project is a joint effort among UGA Skidaway Institute, Georgia Tech, Michigan State University, Wright State University and Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary. The…
Mon, 04/27/2020 - 9:03am
UGA Skidaway Institute of Oceanography researchers may have found a link between shrimp black gill and climate change. Black gill is a condition shrimpers have blamed for devastating their shrimp harvests. It is caused by a single cell parasite.
Mon, 04/20/2020 - 2:52pm
UGA Skidaway Institute of Oceanography scientist Chris Marsay is currently onboard an icebreaker ship that’s frozen solid in the Arctic ice cap. Marsay is part of a major international research project named Multidisciplinary drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate or “MOSAiC.” The German icebreaker Research Vessel Polarstern sailed into the Arctic Ocean last fall until it became locked in the ice. It will remain there, drifting…
Mon, 11/25/2019 - 12:16pm
Savannah, Ga. –UGA Skidaway Institute of Oceanography scientist Chris Marsay will spend much of the coming winter on board an ice breaker frozen solid in the Arctic ice cap. Marsay, working with fellow UGA Skidaway Institute researcher Clifton Buck, is part of a major international research project named Multidisciplinary drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate or “MOSAiC.” The plan is to sail the German ice breaker Research Vessel…
Tue, 11/05/2019 - 8:51am
Great new work by marine scientists Caitlin Amos, Renato Castelao and Patricia Medeiros published in Nature Communications: The 200-mile zone that hugs the curvature of the coast bursts with life, from phytoplankton to whales. Out in the open ocean, this activity is comparatively diminished. Understanding how coastal water is moved offshore fertilizing the open ocean is a long-standing goal of ocean scientists. Now, a new study from University…
Tue, 11/05/2019 - 8:22am
Iron is a critical nutrient for all plant growth in the oceans, but its recycling processes are not well understood which makes climate and ecosystem modeling difficult. A new paper led by Alessandro Tagliabue (U. Liverpool) with collaborators including Daniel Ohnemus at UGA Skidaway shows that unlike traditional nutrients like phosphorus which are efficiently recycled and can accumulate in the ocean, iron recycling is highly inefficient because…
Thu, 06/06/2019 - 2:03pm
Dissolved organic matter supports aquatic food webs and holds as much carbon as the atmosphere. A new study tracks which sources and processes play the biggest role in coastal systems. SOURCE: Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences Aquatic life depends on the tiniest of building blocks: dissolved organic matter (DOM). These dissolved molecules sustain the microbes and phytoplankton that form the foundation of aquatic food chains. The…
Wed, 03/13/2019 - 11:50am
Savannah, Ga. –A team of University of Georgia investigators is working on a murder mystery, not your everyday who-done-it, but one in which the investigators are scientists, and the victims are thousands of tiny oyster larvae.  The mystery began the in the summer of 2017 at the UGA Shellfish Research Laboratory, a unit of UGA Marine Extension and Georgia Sea Grant on Skidaway Island near Savannah. The shellfish lab is leading a movement to…
Mon, 02/11/2019 - 10:52am
What controls the extracellular electron transfer between the archaeal and bacterial cells mediating anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled with sulfate reduction in deep-sea sediments? Despite more than a decade of research, the details of the physiological mechanism underlying AOM are still not completely understood. But a new study, published in the journal Environmental Microbiology with UGA Marine Sciences PhD student Xiaojia He as…

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